The Joy of Slightly Fishy Proofs

I’ve got a proof stuck in my head.

It comes from a man as brilliant as he is grumpy. Last week in the staff room, one of my all-time favorite colleagues busted out a dozen-line proof of a world-famous theorem. Though I doubt it’s original to him, I shall dub it Deeley’s Ditty in his honor:

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This argument is sneaky like a thief. I admire but don’t wholly trust it, because it solves a differential equation by separation of variables, a technique I still regard as black magic.

What I can’t deny is that it’s about 17 million times shorter than the proof I usually show to students, which works via Taylor series:

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You might call this one Taylor’s Opus. It builds like a symphony, with distinct movements, powerful motifs, and a grand finale. It takes familiar objects (trig and exponential functions) and leaves them transformed. It’s rich, challenging, and complete.

It’s also as slow as an aircraft carrier making a three-point turn.

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Here we have two proofs. The first is a nifty shortcut, persuasive but not explanatory. Watching it unfold, I’m unsure whether I’m witnessing a scientific demo or a magic trick.

The second is an elaborate work of architecture. It explains but perhaps overwhelms. If an argument is a connector between one idea and another, then for some students, this will feel like building the George Washington Bridge to span a creek.

The question it prompts, to me, is: What do we want from a proof?

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